Revised Programs

SMHS revised some programs and applications are no longer accepted for the programs listed on this page. Content here is for currently enrolled students only.

Courses

Graduate

BIMD 500. Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science. 6 credits. Fall semester. Prerequisites: (a) a year of organic chemistry or (b) one semester of organic chemistry plus a course in either biochemistry or cell biology, or (c) permission of the course director. A series of lectures and discussion groups with emphasis on interrelated themes in basic biochemistry, cell biology and molecular biology. Lectures will include current and emerging areas of research, while discussion will center on methods, techniques and expansion of lecture topics.

BIMD 510. Basic Biomedical Statistics. 2 credits. A series of lectures, demonstrations and exercises to provide students with the basic rationales for the use of statistics in the assessment of biomedical data and a selected set of the most common and useful statistical tests. Spring semester.

BIMD 513. Seminars in Biomedical Science. 1 credit. A series of presentations on original research conducted by UND faculty members as well as extramural leaders in academic and industrial research in the biomedical sciences. Students will participate through assigned reading and writing exercises related to the presentations.

BIMD 516. Responsible Conduct of Research. *1 credit. A series of lectures and discussion sessions covering topics related to responsible conduct in research. Students will examine a variety of issues including introduction to ethical decision making, the experience of conflict, laboratory practices, data management, reporting of research, conflict of interest, and compliance. Examples and case studies will be drawn primarily from the biomedical sciences.

ANAT 501. Biomedical Information Retrieval. 1 credit. S/U grading only. Offered every session either in a group setting or on an individual basis. This course integrates electron information retrieval techniques with biomedical research education to develop the student's ability to augment traditional learning and research. Electronic techniques covered include database searching and Internet resources.

ANAT 505. Seminar in Anatomy and Cell Biology. 1 credit. This course provides students an opportunity to organize and orally present scientific information to an audience in a forum conducive to the development of their skills in effective communication. Seminars delivered by students, UND faculty, and other invited speakers present current advancements in biomedical research that promote student learning of principles of biomedical sciences.

ANAT 513. Gross Anatomy. 6 credits. Gross Anatomy will be an intensive one semester course that will use a regional approach to enhance the understanding of the structural and functional relationships as well as organization of the adult human body. Lectures will be reinforced with the complete cadaver dissection and multiple clinical imaging modalities to strengthen problem solving and critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: Permission of course director and ANAT 204L or equivalent.

ANAT 517. Principles of Histology. 3 credits. Principles of Histology is a laboratory and discussion based course that involves a strong self-study component through the use of virtual slides as well as lecture and laboratory orientation videos. By the end of the course the student will have demonstrated a significant knowledge base of tissue microanatomy sufficient for understanding and applying the principles to a wide range of research projects. The student will also have sufficient knowledge of histology to be capable of teaching this material to medical, professional, graduate, and undergraduate students. Prerequisites: None.

ANAT 521. Principles of Developmental Biology. 3 credits. This is a student driven course designed to provide the student with a firm understanding of the concepts in developmental biology. Students will be using a wide range of materials from textbooks to the internet to gain a graduate level understanding including how to apply this knowledge to research applications. Student presentations will address advanced principles of developmental mechanisms and underlying human embryology. Prerequisites: None.

ANAT 522. Neuroscience. 6 credits. Faculty-guided inquiry and discussion of readings, student presentations, and neuroanatomy laboratory work introduce students to study of the structure and function of the nervous system. Topics address neural signaling and aspects of developmental, sensorimotor, regulatory, and cognitive neurobiology. Relevant experimental and clinical applications serve as preparation for further, more advanced study of the nervous system. Prerequisites: None.

ANAT 590. Readings in Anatomy and Cell Biology. 1 to 3 credits. Students may elect to do a "readings" project with any of the members of the departmental faculty, in areas related to the faculty member's research field.

ANAT 591. Special Topics in Anatomy and Cell Biology. 1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A series of lectures, discussions and/or laboratory experiences developed around a specific topic in the anatomical or cell biological sciences.

ANAT 593. Research in Anatomy and Cell Biology. Credits arranged. Research is offered in the specialty fields of the faculty of the department, and involves a variety of problems and research tools in morphology and cell biology.

* Available to students registering in graduate degree programs in the biomedical sciences or by permission of the instructor.

Undergraduate

ANAT 204. Anatomy for Paramedical Personnel. 3 credits. This series of two lectures per week presents a systematic study of the human body. F,S

ANAT 204L. Anatomy for Paramedical Personnel. 2 credits. Laboratory exploration of human gross anatomy to complement Anatomy 204. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ANAT 204. F, S

ANAT 490. Directed Studies in Anatomy. 1–3 credits (repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits). Supervised studies and/or laboratory experiences in morphology for one or more students. F,S,SS

ANAT 498. Internship in Anatomy. 1–15 credits (repeatable to a maximum of 15 credits). Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status and instructor consent. This course will provide in-depth study and/or laboratory experiences in morphology in fields of faculty specialization. F,S,SS

Graduate

BIMD 500. Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science. 6 credits. Prerequisites: (a) one year of organic chemistry or (b) one semester of organic chemistry and one course in either biochemistry or cell biology or (c) permission of course director.

A series of lectures and discussion groups with emphasis on interrelated themes in basic biochemistry, cell biology and molecular biology. Lectures will include current and emerging areas of research, while discussion will center on methods, techniques and expansion of lecture topics. Fall semester.

BIMD 510. Basic Biomedical Statistics. 2 credits. Prerequisites: BIMD 500 or permission of course director.

A series of lectures and demonstrations to provide students with the basic rationale for the use of statistics in the assessment of biomedical data and a selected set of the most common and useful statistical tests.

BIMD 513. Seminars in Biomedical Sciences. 1 credit.

A series of presentations on original research conducted by UND faculty members as well as extramural leaders in the fields of academic and industrial research in the biomedical sciences. Students will participate through assigned reading and writing exercises related to the presentations.

BIMD 516. Responsible Conduct of Research. 1 credit.

A series of lectures and discussion sessions covering topics related to responsible conduct in research. Students will examine a variety of issues including introduction to ethical decision making, the experience of conflict, laboratory practices, data management, reporting of research, conflict of interest, and compliance. Examples and case studies will be drawn primarily from the biomedical sciences.

BMB 514. Current Literature. 1 credit. Prerequisite: BIMD 500 or consent of instructor. S/U grading only, S

Students of the department rotate in leading informal reviews, analyses, and the discussions of research papers selected from current journals in the areas of biochemistry and molecular biology.

BMB 521. Seminar. 1 credit. Prerequisite: BIMD 500 or consent of instructor, S/U grading only, F

Students present topics in biochemistry and molecular biology based on reviews of the current literature. Each presentation is followed by a discussion of the topic by the faculty and students of the department.

BMB 533. Advanced Topics. 1 credit. Prerequisites: BIMD 500; alternatively, Biochemistry 301 or equivalent and permission of instructor, S

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth exploration of selected areas of protein structure and function, metabolism, regulation of cell functions, proteomics, recombinant DNA technology, eukaryotic nucleic acid metabolism, and gene expression with the intent of complementing and extending the knowledge base gained in BIMD 500. Extensive independent learning is expected.

BMB 540. Special Topics. 1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIMD 500 or consent of instructor, F, S, SS

Discussion of a topic in biochemistry and/or molecular biology of current interest to faculty and students.

BMB 590. Research. 1 to 12 credits, F, S, SS

The assignments deal with pertinent research problems in various aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology.

BMB 594. Special Problems in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 1 to 6 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, F, S, SS

The student in consultation with a faculty member of the department undertakes a laboratory research project.

BMB 595. Readings in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIMD 500 or consent of instructor, F, S, SS

Selected readings and library research in an area of mutual interest to the student and a faculty member of the department. Conferences and/or written reports are required.

Undergraduate

BMB 301. Biochemistry Lecture. 3 credits. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 240 or 342 or equivalent, S

Topics including enzymology; bioenergetics; metabolism and its regulation; nucleic acid metabolism; recombinant DNA technology; structure and function of macromolecules.

BMB 401. Biochemistry of Proteins and Information Flow. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BMB 301, F

This course will build upon the overview of biochemistry and molecular biology as presented in BMB 301. Lectures will emphasize advanced topics in protein structure and function, enzymology, and the expression and transmission of genetic information. An independent project in proteomics or computational biochemistry will be required.

BMB 403. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisites: BMB 401 (may be taken the same semester) and permission of instructor, F

Students will demonstrate competency in understanding and performing physical and molecular techniques commonly used in biomedical research.

BMB 494. Directed Studies. 1 to 4 credits, repeatable to 12 credits, F, S, SS

A course designed to provide individual students with the opportunity for creative, scholarly, and research activities in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology under the direction of a department faculty member. Open to all students, with consent of the instructor required.

 

Graduate

BIMD 500. Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science. 7 credits. Prerequisite: (A) one year of organic chemistry or (B) one semester of organic chemistry and one course in either biochemistry or cell biology or (C) permission of course director.

The focus of this interdepartmental, team-taught course will be in areas that are fundamental to all biomedical science graduate programs. Emphasis will be on developing a strong grounding in biochemistry, cell biology and molecular biology with themes covering proteins, metabolism, information flow, vectors, membranes, cell signaling, cell shape and movement, cell growth and division, and immunology.

BIMD 510. Basic Biomedical Statistics. 2 credits. Prerequisites: BIMD 500 or permission of course director.

A series of lectures and demonstrations to provide students with the basic rationale for the use of statistics in the assessment of biomedical data and a selected set of the most common and useful statistical tests.

BIMD 512. Seminars in Biomedical Sciences. 1 credit. Corequisite: BIMD 500 or permission of course director.

Students will attend a weekly school-wide seminar series. Students will further explore aspects of scientific literature and fundamentals of scientific writing, and have opportunities to interact with intramural seminar speakers.

BIMD 513. Seminars in Biomedical Sciences. 1 credit. Prerequisites: BIMD 512 or permission of course director.

A series of presentations on original research conducted by UND faculty members as well as extramural leaders in the fields of academic and industrial research in the biomedical sciences. Students will participate through assigned reading and writing exercises related to the presentation.

*501. Molecular Virology. 2 credits. Prerequisites: Microbiology and biochemistry and/or consent of instructor.

Genetics and molecular biology of animal and bacterial viruses, with emphasis on viral-host interactions, viral replication and viral gene expression.

*504. Microbial Physiology. 2 credits. Prerequisites: A basic course in microbiology and organic or biochemistry or consent of instructor.

The course will investigate the physiology of the bacterial cell as it pertains to the processes carried out by the cell. Topics will include basic cell structure, motility, chemotaxis, uptake of nutrients, metabolism, gene regulation, evolution, cell division, differentiation, and pathogenesis. The integration of various cellular functions to sustain the living cell will be emphasized. The course will be based largely on current literature and will involve class discussions of assigned topics. In addition to gaining an understanding of the bacterial cell, students will learn to read primary literature critically and the principles involved in writing a scientific paper.

*507. Seminar in Microbiology. 1 credit. S/U grading only.

*508. Microbial Pathogenesis. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BIMD 500 or equivalent.

A detailed study of pathogenic microorganisms and the mechanisms by which they cause tissue and cell injury.

*509. Immunology. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIMD 500 or equivalent.

An introduction to the fundamentals of immunology, including immunochemistry, humoral and cellular response, hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency, immunogenetics, tolerance and immunodiagnosis.

*511. Microbiology & Immunology Literature. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Microbiology 302 or equivalent.

A series of reports of current scientific literature in Microbiology and Immunology. S/U grading only.

*512. Microbial Genetics. 2 credits. Prerequisites: Basic courses in genetics and microbiology or biochemistry and/or consent of instructor.

Genetic mechanisms in microorganisms, mutagenesis, fine structure of genetic material, genetic engineering. Selected Readings.

*513. Research Tools. 2 credits. Orientation to research and laboratory safety.

The theory and application of modern laboratory techniques of tissue culture, cell fractionation, enzyme assay, immunization procedures, bacterial growth curves, photomicrography, strain construction, genetic engineering, gel electrophoresis, enzyme immunoassay, and western blot techniques are presented. S/U grading only.

515. Advanced Topics. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Previous basic course in the area to be covered.

A series of topics in microbiology and immunology presented on an episodic basis. The topics may vary, but are expected to include: (A) Immunology, (B) Infectious Diseases, and (C) Molecular Biology.

*517. Advanced Immunology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Microbiology 509 or equivalent.

Laboratory experience will include procedures for analysis of antigens, antibodies and cell mediated immune responses.

*590. Research in Microbiology. 2 to 6 credits. Hours arranged. Advanced problems in microbiology and related fields.

*591. Special Problems in Microbiology. 1 to 6 credits

Short term research projects performed under the supervision of a department faculty member. Intended to provide interested capable students with a challenge and an opportunity to conduct scientific research in microbiology. Arranged by consultation with participating faculty members.

Undergraduate

202. Introductory Medical Microbiology Lecture. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Chem 116 or 121.

Three hours lecture per week. An introductory medical microbiology course for nursing and clinical lab science students. Other majors wishing to enroll in the course may call the instructor to be placed on a waiting list, and any course openings remaining after summer registration will be made available to nonmajors. This course provides a background in all aspects of microbial agents and disease. F

202L. Introductory Medical Microbiology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Chem 116 or 121. Corequisite: MBio 202.

Four hours laboratory per week. An introductory laboratory course in the isolation and identification of all types of microorganisms with an emphasis on those that cause disease. F

302. General Microbiology Lecture. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Biol 150, Chem 116 or 121

Two hours lecture per week. An introduction to general microbiology with emphasis on the morphology, classification and physiology of bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses. The significance of microorganisms in food processing, waste disposal and in maintaining our environment is discussed. S

302L. General Microbiology Laboratory. 2 credits. Corequisite: MBio 302.

Four hours laboratory per week. The growth, isolation and identification of microorganisms from a variety of sources using procedures such as staining, microscopy, pure culturing, and biochemical tests. S

328. Introduction to Immunology. 2 credits. Prerequisites: Biol 150, 151, or BiCh 301 or equivalent.

An introduction to the fundamentals of immunology, including immunochemistry, humoral and cellular response, hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency, immunogenetics, tolerance and immunodiagnosis. F

494. Directed Studies (CCN). 1–3 credits

A course designed to provide individual students with the opportunity for creative, scholarly and research activities in microbiology and immunology under the direction of a department faculty member. Open to all students with the consent of the instructor required. F,S,SS

Graduate

BIMD 500. Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science. 6 credits. Prerequisites: (a) one year of organic chemistry or (b) one semester of organic chemistry and one course in either biochemistry or cell biology or (c) permission of course director.

A series of lectures and discussion groups with emphasis on interrelated themes in basic biochemistry, cell biology and molecular biology. Lectures will include current and emerging areas of research, while discussion will center on methods, techniques and expansion of lecture topics. Fall semester.

BIMD 510. Basic Biomedical Statistics. 2 credits. Prerequisites: BIMD 500 or permission of course director. A series of lectures and demonstrations to provide students with the basic rationale for the use of statistics in the assessment of biomedical data and a selected set of the most common and useful statistical tests.

BIMD 512. Seminars in Biomedical Sciences. 1 credit. Corequisite: BIMD 500 or permission of course director. Students will attend a weekly school-wide seminar series. Students will further explore aspects of scientific literature and fundamentals of scientific writing, and have opportunities to interact with intramural seminar speakers.

BIMD 513. Seminars in Biomedical Sciences. 1 credit. Prerequisites: BIMD 512 or permission of course director. A series of presentations on original research conducted by UND faculty members as well as extramural leaders in the fields of academic and industrial research in the biomedical sciences. Students will participate through assigned reading and writing exercises related to the presentations.

PPT 500. Principles of Physiology and Pharmacology. 6 credits. Prerequisites: BIMD 500 or consent of instructor. Graduate level survey course covering basic principles of human physiology and pharmacology. Material covered will include the physiology (how the body works) and the pharmacology (how drugs affect physiological functions) of the major organ systems. Covered also will be basic pharmacological principles including pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and therapeutics. Teaching modalities used are designed to actively engage students in critical thinking and knowledge application.

PPT 503. Advanced Pharmacology or Physiology. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PPT 500 or consent of instructor.

PPT 505. Research Techniques. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

PPT 511. Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIMD 500, PPT 500 or consent of instructor. Fundamental concepts of pharmacology with emphasis on biochemical and molecular mechanisms.

PPT 512. Special Topics in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An in-depth coverage of a particular topic chosen by the instructor.

PPT 521. Seminar in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. 1 credit.

PPT 525. Advanced Renal Physiology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 500 or consent of instructor.

PPT 526. Advanced Respiratory Physiology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 500 or consent of instructor.

PPT 527. Advanced Neurophysiology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 500 or consent of instructor.

PPT 528. Advanced Endocrinology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 500 or consent of instructor.

PPT 529. Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 500 or consent of instructor.

PPT 530. Advanced Neurochemistry. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 500 or consent of instructor. This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the discipline of neurochemistry. This course builds on concepts introduced in PPT 500, with an emphasis on brain biochemical processes occurring in health and disease.

PPT 535. Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disorders. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 500 or consent of instructor. This advanced course is designed for the graduate student who has a background in basic neuroscience. The course directive is to provide an overview of the more common neurodegenerative disorders and address the "state of the field" for each. The course emphasis will be upon pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and therapeutic options.

PPT 540. Molecular Neuropharmacology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIMD 500 or PPT 500 or consent of instructor. This advanced course is designed to introduce students to the latest developments in molecular neuropharmacology. It is intended for graduate students who have a background in pharmacology and/or basic neurophysiology. The course directive is to provide an up-to-date foundation for clinical neuroscience by emphasizing a comprehensive molecular and cellular approach to the effects of drugs on the nervous system.

PPT 590. Readings in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. 1 to 4 credits repeatable to a maximum of 4 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A supervised readings course on topics of mutual interest to the student and a faculty member. Consent of instructor required.

PPT 591. Research in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. Credits arranged.

PPT 996. Continuing Enrollment. Consent of instructor required.

PPT 998. Thesis. Credits arranged. Preparation and defense of a thesis based on original research. Consent of instructor required.

PPT 999. Dissertation. Credits arranged. Preparation and defense of a dissertation based on original research. Consent of instructor required.

Undergraduate

PPT 294. ST: Biomed Research in Physiology. 1-4 credits, repeatable to 4 credits. Prerequisites: advanced undergraduate standing and consent of instructor. Laboratory research under faculty supervision. F,S,SS

PPT 301. Mechanics of Human Physiology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: introductory courses in two of the following subjects: anatomy, chemistry or biology. A study of the normal function of the human body with particular consideration given to the necessary background needed by students pursuing a course of study in Allied Health Sciences. There are five hours of formal classroom study including two hours of laboratory and an optional review period each week. F,S,SS

PPT 315. Introduction to Pharmacology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PPT 301 and Chem 107 or equivalent. A survey of the more important drugs used in medicine, including basic principles, clinical uses and possible adverse effects. S

PPT 410. Drugs Subject to Abuse. 2 credits. Prerequisite: advanced undergraduate standing. Biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, and therapeutic aspects of substance abuse. S

PPT 492. Research in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. 1-4 credits, repeatable up to maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Laboratory research under faculty supervision. F,S,SS

PPT 499. Readings in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. 1-4 credits. Prerequisites: advanced undergraduate standing and consent of instructor. Topics and credits to be arranged with the instructor. F,S,SS

Degree Requirements

Anatomy Graduate Student Manual

Students accepted to either of the graduate programs, Master of Science (M.S.) or Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Anatomy and Cell Biology will receive formal education and training to prepare them for careers in teaching and research, or in a variety of scientific settings such as biotechnology industries or biomedical research institutes. The degree of M.S. or Ph.D. is conferred upon successful completion of an individual’s program. Programs for students will be based on the individual’s scientific interests and career goals within the framework of required courses and activities. Requirements for both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees entail coursework and original, independent research in the basic biomedical sciences of cell biology and/or neurobiology.

Graduate students will be taking graduate level courses, conducting original research under the guidance of a graduate faculty member, developing a scientific expertise based on experimentation and study, and assisting in the instruction of students. The following is an outline of the requirements for a degree earned at the M.S. level and at the Ph.D. level.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Students seeking the Master of Science degree through the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at UND must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology.

Coursework

  • Minimum of 37 semester hours of graduate credit.
  • Completion of the following core graduate level courses (31 credits):

BIMD 500

Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science

6 cr

BIMD 510

Basic Biomedical Statistics

2 cr

BIMD 513

Seminars in Biomedical Science

1 cr

BIMD 516

Responsible Conduct of Research

1 cr

ANAT 505

Seminar in Anatomy and Cell Biology
(one semester for each year in the program, excluding year one)

1 cr

ANAT 593

Research

16 cr

ANAT 998

Thesis in Anatomy and Cell Biology

4 cr

 

Total required number of credits

31 cr

Completion of a minimum of 6 credits selected from among the Anatomy and Cell Biology graduate level courses listed below:

ANAT 513

Gross Anatomy

6 cr

ANAT 517

Principles of Histology

3 cr

ANAT 521

Principles of Developmental Biology

3 cr

ANAT 522

Neuroscience

6 cr

ANAT 591

Special Topics in Anatomy and Cell Biology

1–3 cr

BMB 533

Advanced Topics

1–3 cr

MBIO 501

Molecular Virology

2 cr

MBIO 504

Microbial Physiology

2 cr

MBIO 508

Microbial Pathogenesis

2 cr

MBIO 509

Immunology

3 cr

MBIO 512

Microbial Genetics

2 cr

MBIO 519

Advanced Immunology

2 cr

PPT 500

Principles of Physiology and Pharmacology

6 cr

PPT 511

Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacology

3 cr

PPT 525

Advanced Renal Physiology

3 cr

PPT 526

Advanced Respiratory Physiology

3 cr

PPT 527

Advanced Neurophysiology

3 cr

PPT 528

Advanced Endocrinology

3 cr

PPT 529

Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology

3 cr

PPT 530

Advanced Neurochemistry

3 cr

PPT 535

Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disorders

3 cr

PPT 540

Molecular Neuropharmacology

3 cr

 

Total minimum number of credits

37 cr

Other graduate level courses may be selected if approved by the graduate student’s Faculty Advisory Committee. Elective courses chosen should be appropriate to the student’s area of interest.

A thesis written on an independent research problem.

Research

  • The M.S. Program in Anatomy and Cell Biology required completion of a thesis, based on laboratory research, which has been supervised by a faculty member.
  • Students must obtain a three-member Faculty Advisory Committee, comprised of the faculty advisor as chairperson (faculty advisor must be at least an associate member of the graduate faculty), and at least one member from the Anatomy and Cell Biology graduate faculty.
  • Students must file a Program of Student, and an Outline of Thesis with the Graduate School, both of which must be approved by the Advisory Committee. Deadlines set in the Academic Calendar must be met if the student wishes to graduate on time.
  • The thesis prepared by the candidate must be presented and defended before the Advisory Committee and the Anatomy and Cell Biology graduate faculty.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The graduation requirements for the Ph.D. degree in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology consist of required and elective coursework, research leading to the preparation of a dissertation, teaching in major courses, and scholarly tools (minimum of 90 semester hours of graduate credit).

Coursework

  • Minimum of 90 semester hours of graduate credit.
  • Completion of the following core graduate level courses (81 credits):

BIMD 500

Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science

6 cr

BIMD 510

Basic Biomedical Statistics

2 cr

BIMD 513

Seminars in Biomedical Science

1 cr

BIMD 516

Responsible Conduct of Research

1 cr

ANAT 505

Seminar in Anatomy and Cell Biology
(one semester for each year in the program, excluding year one)

3 cr

ANAT 593

Research in Anatomy and Cell Biology

62 cr

ANAT 999

Dissertation in Anatomy and Cell Biology

6 cr

 

Total required number of credits

81 cr

Completion of a minimum of 9 credits selected from among the Anatomy and Cell Biology graduate level courses listed below:

ANAT 513

Gross Anatomy

6 cr

ANAT 522

Neuroscience

6 cr

ANAT 517

Principles of Histology

3 cr

ANAT 521

Principles of Developmental Biology

3 cr

ANAT 591

Special Topics in Anatomy and Cell Biology (per course)

1–3 cr

BMB 533

Advanced Topics

1–3 cr

MBIO 501

Molecular Virology

2 cr

MBIO 504

Microbial Physiology

2 cr

MBIO 508

Microbial Pathogenesis

2 cr

MBIO 509

Immunology

3 cr

MBIO 512

Microbial Genetics

2 cr

MBIO 519

Advanced Immunology

2 cr

PPT 500

Principles of Physiology and Pharmacology

6 cr

PPT 511

Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacology

3 cr

PPT 525

Advanced Renal Physiology

3 cr

PPT 526

Advanced Respiratory Physiology

3 cr

PPT 527

Advanced Neurophysiology

3 cr

PPT 528

Advanced Endocrinology

3 cr

PPT 529

Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology

3 cr

PPT 530

Advanced Neurochemistry

3 cr

PPT 535

Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disorders

3 cr

PPT 540

Molecular Neuropharmacology

3 cr

 

Total minimum number of credits

90 cr

Other graduate level courses may be selected if approved by the graduate student’s Faculty Advisory Committee. Elective courses chosen should be appropriate to the student’s area of interest.

All candidates for the Ph.D. degree must demonstrate competence in the scholarly tools for study and research in the discipline of Anatomy and Cell Biology. Each department at UND is responsible for establishing its own “Scholarly Tool” requirements. For the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, this requirement is fulfilled by successfully completing a course in biomedical statistics (e.g., BIMD 510 or the equivalent).

Students must serve as a teaching assistant:

  • Teaching and directing two semesters of ANAT 204 Laboratory, or 
  • Other equivalent teaching experience as approved by the ACB Graduate Advisory committee

Research

The Ph.D. degree in Anatomy and Cell Biology requires a completion of a dissertation based on the results of a research project completed by the graduate student under the guidance of a faculty advisor. The project must represent an original and independent investigation by the student. It is expected that the results of the research will be published in a refereed scientific journal. The dissertation prepared by the candidate must make a significant contribution of the advancement of knowledge in the field and must be presented and defended before the student’s Faculty Advisory Committee and the Anatomy and Cell Biology graduate faculty.

Master of Science (M.S.)

The Master of Science degree requires completion of at least 30 semester credits (including research and thesis), achievement of an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale), satisfactory preparation of a thesis, and a successful performance on an oral examination covering course work and thesis-related material. Emphasis is placed on the research experience.

Requirements

  • A minimum of 30 credit hours including research and thesis.
  • A grade of at least C in BIMD 500.
  • Completion of BIMD 510, 513, and 516.
  • Completion of three credits of BMB533.
  • Completion of 1 credit each of BMB 514 and 521.
  • An overall GPA of at least 3.0.
  • An acceptable thesis.
  • Minimum Course Requirements as follows:
    • BIMD 500 Cellular & Molecular Foundations 6 credits
    • BIMD 510 Basic Biomedical Statistics 2 credits
    • BIMD 513 Seminar in Biomedical Sciences 1 credits
    • BIMD 516 Responsible Conduct of Research 1 credits
    • BMB 514 Current Literature 1 credits
    • BMB 521 Seminar 1 credits
    • BMB 533 Advanced Biochem. & Molec. Biol. 3 credits
    • BMB 590 and 998 Research & Thesis 14 credits
    • Minimum Total Credits 30 credits

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Doctor of Philosophy requires completion of at least 90 semester credits (including six credits outside the department, a scholarly tool and research and dissertation), achievement of an overall grade point average of at least 3.0, and satisfactory preparation and oral defense of the dissertation. Strong emphasis is placed on an original research project intended to result in peer-reviewed publication.

Requirements

  • Performance of original research suitable for publication in a refereed journal and the preparation of a dissertation.
  • A minimum of 90 credit hours, including research and dissertation.
  • A scholarly tool (normally met by taking BIMD 510 or its equivalent).
  • A grade of at least B in BIMD 500.
  • Completion of BIMD 510, 513, 515 and 516.
  • Completion of six credits of BMB 533.
  • Completion of two credits each of BMB 514 and 521.
  • An overall GPA of at least 3.0.
  • At least 6 credits of formal course work outside of the department.
  • Passing performance on oral and written comprehensive examinations covering the course work in the major and related areas.
  • Preparation and oral defense of a satisfactory dissertation.
  • Minimum Course Requirements as follows:
    • BIMD 500 Cellular & Molecular Foundations 6 credits
    • BIMD 510 Basic Biomedical Statistics 2 credits
    • BIMD 513 Seminar in Biomedical Sciences 1 credits
    • BIMD 516 Responsible Conduct of Research 1 credits
    • BMB 514 Current Literature 2 credits
    • BMB 521 Seminar 2 credits
    • BMB 533 Advanced Biochem. & Molec. Biol. 6 credits
    • Electives 6 credits
    • BMB 590 and 999 Research & Dissertation 63 credits
    • Minimum Total Credits 90 credits

Additional Notes

A student with excellent credentials may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. degree program. After one calender year in the program, the faculty will review the progress of the student. To remain in the Ph.D. program, the student must meet the following requirements:

  • Accumulation of a minimum of 26 graduate credits with a GPA of 3.5 or greater.
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in BIMD 500, 510, 512 and 513 and either BMB 531 or 532.
  • A minimum of 8 credits of BMB 590.

A student initially admitted to the master's degree program may be allowed to proceed toward the Ph.D. degree without obtaining a M.S. in the Department. Advancement into the doctoral program requires approval by the student's Advisory Committee, the dean of the School of Graduate Studies, and fulfillment of the following requirements:

  • Accumulation of a minimum of 26 graduate credits with a GPA of 3.5 or greater.
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in BIMD 500, 510, 512 and 513 and either BMB 531 or 532.
  • A minimum of 8 credits of BMB 590.
  • Approval of change in program status by two-thirds of the faculty members in the department after review of the student's academic accomplishments, research performance and professional conduct.

Core requirements for M.S. and Ph.D. degrees include courses in biochemistry, microbiology, molecular biology, immunology, and graduate seminars. The scholarly tool requirement for Ph.D. students consists of a minimum of six credits of statistics and/or computer science. For both the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, students are expected to carry out original research suitable for publication in a professional journal.

Master's degree candidates are required to write a thesis and defend their research in a final oral examination. Doctoral candidates are required to successfully complete both a written and oral comprehensive examination as well as to write a dissertation and defend their research in a final oral examination.

Master of Science (M.S.)

The graduate requirements for a Master of Science in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics consist of required coursework and research leading to the preparation of a thesis. In addition to the general requirements listed in the Academic Catalog, the following must be completed by all candidates for the M.S. in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics.

Coursework (26-30 credits)

  • Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science (BIMD 500, 6credits)
  • Basic Biomedical Statistics (BIMD 510, 1 credits)
  • Seminars in Biomedical Science (BIMD 512/513, 1 credits)
  • Principles of Physiology and Pharmacology (PPT 500, 6 credits)
  • Seminar in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics (PPT 521, 1 credit)
  • At least six credits of electives from the following courses as approved by the Faculty Advisory Committee:
    • Advanced Pharmacology or Physiology (PPT 503, 3 credits)
    • Advanced Neurophysiology (PPT 527, 3 credits)
    • Advanced Endocrinology (PPT 528, 3 credits)
    • Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacology (PPT 511, 3 credits)
    • Research Techniques (PPT 505, 1-3 credits)
    • Advanced Neurochemistry (PPT 530, 3 credits)
    • Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disorders (PPT 535, 3 credits)
    • Molecular Neuropharmacology (PPT 540, 3 credits)

Teaching

The teaching requirement will be defined by the student's Faculty Advisory Committee and will include one semester of laboratory teaching (e.g. PPT 301) or the development, presentation, and assessment of lectures related to one educational unit as defined by the instructor of record in a Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics undergraduate course. Other options may be recommended for approval by Departmental Faculty.

Research and Thesis (6-20 credits)

The M.S. in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics requires completion of a thesis based on the results of a research project completed by the graduate student under the guidance of a faculty advisor. The project must represent an original and independent investigation by the student. It is expected that the results of the research will be published in a refereed scientific journal. The thesis prepared by the candidate must be presented and defended before the Faculty Advisory Committee and the Departmental Faculty.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The graduate requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics consist of required coursework and research leading to the preparation of a dissertation. In addition to the general requirements listed in the Academic Catalog, the following must be completed by all candidates for the Ph.D. in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics.

Coursework (36-40 credits)

  • Cellular and Molecular Foundations of Biomedical Science (BIMD 500, 6 credits)
  • Basic Biomedical Statistics (BIMD 510, 1 credit)
  • Seminars in Biomedical Science (BIMD 512/513, 1 credit)
  • Principles of Physiology and Pharmacology (PPT 500, 6 credits)
  • Seminar in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics (PPT 521, 1 credit)
  • At least 12 credits of electives from the following courses as approved by the Faculty Advisory Committee:
    • Advanced Pharmacology or Physiology (PPT 503, 3 credits)
    • Advanced Neurophysiology (PPT 527, 3 credits)
    • Advanced Endocrinology (PPT 528, 3 credits)
    • Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacology (PPT 511, 3 credits)
    • Advanced Neurochemistry (PPT 530, 3 credits)
    • Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disorders (PPT 535, 3 credits)
    • Molecular Neuropharmacology (PPT 540, 3 credits)

Teaching

The teaching requirement will be defined by the student's Faculty Advisory Committee and will include one semester of laboratory teaching (e.g. PPT 301) or the development, presentation, and assessment of lectures related to one educational unit as defined by the instructor of record in a Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics undergraduate course. Other options may be recommended by the Faculty Advisory Committee for approval by Departmental Faculty.

Scholarly Tools

Students must complete at least one laboratory research techniques course (e.g. PPT 505, Research Techniques) at the graduate level.

Research and Dissertation

The Ph.D. in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics requires completion of a dissertation based on the results of a research project completed by the graduate student under the guidance of a faculty advisor. The project must represent an original and independent investigation by the student. It is expected that the results of the research will be published in a refereed scientific journal. The dissertation prepared by the candidate must be presented and defended before the Faculty Advisory Committee and the Departmental Faculty.